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Treatment and Outcomes of First Troponin-Negative Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Corteville, D.C., D.F. Armstrong, D.G. Montgomery, E. Kline-Rogers, Zachary Goldberger, J.B. Froehlich, H.S. Gurm, and K.A. Eagle. 2011. "Treatment and Outcomes of First Troponin-Negative Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction." American Journal of Cardiology, 107(1): 24-29.

Little is known about non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with an initial negative troponin finding. The aim of this study was to determine in post hoc analysis of a large regional medical center presenting clinical characteristics, treatment differences, and in-hospital and 6-month outcomes of first troponin-negative MI (FTNMI). In this study, 659 of 1,855 consecutive patients with non-ST-segment elevation MI (35.5%) were classified as having FTNMI. In-hospital cardiac catheterization rates were similar between the 2 groups (70.1% vs 71.5%, p = 0.53) In hospital, patients with FTNMI were less likely to receive statins (48.9% vs 59.9%, p < 0.001). On discharge, patients with FTNMI were less likely to be on clopidogrel (53.1% vs 59.0%, p = 0.019) and statins (67.7% vs 75.2%, p < 0.001). At 6-month follow-up, patients with FTNMI were less likely to be on clopidogrel (43.5% vs 55.2%, p = 0.01) In-hospital recurrent ischemia was 2 times as common in FTNMI (20.1% vs 11.5%, p < 0.001). There were no differences, however, in congestive heart failure, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, stroke, or death in hospital. At 6 months, patients with FTNMI were 2 times as likely to have had recurrent MI (12.0% vs 6.6%, p < 0.001). Combined end points of death at 6 months, MI, stroke, and rehospitalization were higher for FTNMI (47.7% vs 40.9%, p = 0.017); however, this was due to higher rates of recurrent MI. In conclusion, patients with FTNMI received less aggressive pharmacotherapy and were 2 times as likely to have recurrent MI at 6 months. FTNMI is common and represents a clinical entity that should be treated more aggressively. Published by Elsevier Inc. (Am J Cardiol 2011;107:24-29)

DOI:10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.08.040 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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