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Mon, March 13, 2017, noon:
Rachel Best

Susan Hautaniemi Leonard photo

Immigration, wealth and the ‘mortality plateau’ in emergent industrial cities of nineteenth-century Massachusetts

Publication Abstract

Leonard, Susan Hautaniemi, Jefferey K. Beemer, and Douglas Anderton. 2012. "Immigration, wealth and the ‘mortality plateau’ in emergent industrial cities of nineteenth-century Massachusetts." Continuity and Change, 27(3): 433-459.

The mortality transition in Western Europe and the United States encompassed a much more complex set of conditions and experiences than earlier thought. Our research addresses the complex set of relationships among growing urban communities, family wealth, immigration and mortality in New England by examining individual-level, sociodemographic mortality correlates during the nineteenth-century mortality plateau and its early twentieth-century decline. In contrast to earlier theories that proposed a more uniform mortality transition, we offer an alternative hypothesis that focuses on the impact of family wealth and immigration on individual-level mortality during the early stages of the mortality transition in Northampton and Holyoke, Massachusetts.

DOI:10.1017/S0268416012000215 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3650859. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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