Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Buchmueller breaks down partisan views on Obamacare

ISR's Conrad says mobile phone polling faces non-response bias

ISR's Jacob, Dynarski and team evaluate effectiveness of youth policy interventions in new U-M initiative

More News


Gonzalez, Alter, and Dinov win NSF "Big Data Spokes" award for neuroscience network

Post-doc Melanie Wasserman wins dissertation award from Upjohn Institute

ISR kicks off DE&I initiative with lunchtime presentation: Oct 13, noon, 1430 ISR Thompson

U-M ranked #4 in USN&WR's top public universities

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Oct 24 at noon:
Academic innovation & the global public research university, James Hilton

Adults with cardiovascular disease who help others: a prospective study of health outcomes

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Heisler, Michele, HwaJung Choi, John Piette, AnnMarie Rosland, Kenneth M. Langa, and Stephanie Brown. 2013. "Adults with cardiovascular disease who help others: a prospective study of health outcomes." Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 36(2): 199-211.

Little is known about the health impact of helping behaviors among individuals with high-risk chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). Using a nationally representative, longitudinal survey, we examined the subsequent health of adults with CVD (n = 4,491) who spent time providing non-paid assistance to family and friends outside of their households compared with those who had provided no assistance. After both adjusting for baseline characteristics and using propensity score matching methods, spending up to 200 h over the prior 12 months helping others was associated with lower odds of experiencing a new CVD event or dying in the subsequent 2 years. Providing up to 100 h of assistance was associated with reporting fewer depressive symptoms. This threshold effect raises the question of whether assistance beyond a certain number of hours may impose a burden that mitigates health benefits from helping others. Health care providers could play an important role exploring ways that patients with CVD can provide beneficial levels of assistance to others in their own social networks or communities, thereby possibly also improving their own health.

DOI:10.1007/s10865-012-9414-4 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3929385. (Pub Med Central)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next