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Variation of cervical cancer incidence in Latin America and the Caribbean

Publication Abstract

Campbell, Christine M. Pierce, M. Curado, Sioban D. Harlow, and A. Soliman. 2012. "Variation of cervical cancer incidence in Latin America and the Caribbean." Revista Panamericana De Salud Publica-Pan American Journal of Public Health, 31(6): 492-498.

Objective. To provide a comprehensive analysis of the descriptive epidemiology of invasive cervical cancer in Latin America and the Caribbean by analyzing quality data from the area's cancer registries, including data that were excluded from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) publication, Cancer Incidence in Five Continents, Vol. IX (CI5-IX). Methods. This was a descriptive epidemiologic study that involved 20 cancer registries, 9 of which were included by IARC in CI5-IX, and 11 of which were not. Data on invasive cervical cancers diagnosed from 1998-2002 were obtained from IARC. A cervical cancer-specific quality assessment was performed on all registries whether or not they were included in CI5-IX. Data from 14 registries met quality criteria and were analyzed. Incidence rates were calculated and compared across registries. Results. A substantial variation in incidence rates existed among the registries; age-standardized rates ranged from 14.6-44.0 per 100 000 women per year. Mean cervical cancer incidence rates were 10.4% higher for registries included in CI5-IX than for those excluded; however, this difference was not significant (P = 0.541). Conclusions. This study compared cervical cancer rates from a more diverse group of Latin American and Caribbean countries than that of the CI5-IX. The heterogeneity found among registries highlights the importance of examining data from as many registries as possible when characterizing risk across a geographic area. Data from developing countries can be used to better understand cancer distribution and enable Region-specific recommendations on cancer control and prevention once data quality has been established.

PMCID: PMC3629916. (Pub Med Central)

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