Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

More News

Highlights

Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Human exposure from dioxins in soil

Publication Abstract

Demond, A., A. Franzblau, D. Garabrant, X. Jiang, P. Adriaens, Q. Chen, B. Gillespie, W. Hao, B. Hong, O. Jolliet, and James M. Lepkowski. 2012. "Human exposure from dioxins in soil." Environmental Science and Technology, 46(3): 1296-302.

Dioxins are a family of chemical compounds that has received considerable attention, both historically and currently. This article reviews scientific field studies that examine the relationship between living on soil contaminated with dioxins and the level of dioxins in people's serum, with an emphasis on the University of Michigan Dioxin Exposure Study (UMDES), the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind. These studies conclude that the levels of dioxins in serum are most strongly correlated with age, gender, body mass index, weight loss, breast feeding, and smoking. Levels of dioxins in soil are not significant predictors for dioxin concentrations in serum. The increase in serum dioxin levels that is seen with age results from historic exposure and does not represent ongoing exposure. Based on the scientific field studies conducted to date, it appears that, in the absence of the consumption of contaminated animal products, there is little evidence of ongoing exposure from contaminated soil.

DOI:10.1021/es2022363 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next