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Homicides involving firearms in Argentina between 1991 and 2006: a multilevel analysis

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Gabriela Zunino, M., Ana Diez Roux, and E. de Souza. 2012. "Homicides involving firearms in Argentina between 1991 and 2006: a multilevel analysis." Ciencia and Saude Coletiva, 17(12): 3219-3232.

The influence of variables at different levels of organization and the effect of time on the occurrence of firearm-related homicides (FRH) in Argentina between 1991 and 2006 was analyzed using multilevel analysis. A three-level Poisson regression model was used. The first level corresponded to the distribution of the number of FRH by sex and age group for each administrative region and (four-year) period; the second corresponded to the variation over time in the interior of each administrative region; the third modeled the variation between administrative regions in accordance with the Level of Urbanization, Percentage of Homes with Unsatisfied Basic Needs and the Percentage of Working Adults. There were 15,067 FRH in persons aged 14 and over between 1991 and 2006 in the 493 administrative regions. The risk of death was higher in males and persons of 15 to 29 years of age; ages above that were associated with a lower risk. The influence of age was greater in central-urban zones and between 1999 and 2002 than during other periods. The level of urbanization was the socioeconomic variable most strongly associated with FRH risk. The risk of death from FRH was 1.6 times higher in central-urban zones compared with non-central zones. In both zones, the risk was highest between 1999 and 2002.

Country of focus: Argentina.

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