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Measuring urinary incontinence in a population of women in northern Mexico: prevalence and severity

Publication Abstract

Garcia-Perez, H., Sioban D. Harlow, C. Sampselle, and C. Denman. 2012. "Measuring urinary incontinence in a population of women in northern Mexico: prevalence and severity." International Urogynecology Journal, 24(5): 847-854.

INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to estimate the prevalence of urinary incontinence and its associated risk factors among women in northern Mexico. The type and severity of incontinence were also assessed. METHODS: This cross-sectional population-based study assessed self-reported urinary incontinence in a random sample of 1,307 women aged 25-54 years. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association of urinary incontinence with sociodemographic and reproductive characteristics and other medical conditions. RESULTS: Overall, 18.4% of participants reported having involuntary loss of urine at some time within the last 12 months (95% CI, 16.4-20.7%). Among women reporting urinary incontinence, stress incontinence was the most common form (56.8%), followed by mixed (31.1%) and urge incontinence (10.0%). Approximately half of the women with urinary incontinence symptoms reported a severity index of moderate (25.8%) to severe (26.2%), with 30% stating that their leakage was extremely bothersome. Forty percent of incontinent women reported use of some sort of protection, although only 28% had ever talked to a physician about their symptoms. In adjusted analyses, high body mass index (BMI) >/=25 kg/m(2), chronic urinary tract infections, and a history of a hysterectomy or uterine leiomyomata were associated with increased odds of reporting incontinence symptoms. Increased odds of reporting severe urinary incontinence was associated with chronic urinary tract infections, current smoking and high BMI. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that there might be a need to develop a culturally sensitive screening questionnaire in order to identify and counsel women with mild incontinence symptoms in the primary care setting.

DOI:10.1007/s00192-012-1949-y (Full Text)

Country of focus: Mexico.

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