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Hispanic Familism Reconsidered: Ethnic Differences in the Perceived Value of Children and Fertility Intentions

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Hartnett, Caroline Sten, and E. Parrado. 2012. "Hispanic Familism Reconsidered: Ethnic Differences in the Perceived Value of Children and Fertility Intentions." Sociological Quarterly, 53(4): 636-653.

Familism has been described as a cultural trait that might explain why the fertility of Hispanic women remains higher than non-Hispanic white women. Still, few studies have analyzed group differences in childbearing attitudes. This article focuses on two dimensions of childbearing orientation: social value of children and fertility intentions. Using the National Survey of Family Growth, we find limited support for the idea that familism undergirds differentials in fertility between native-born Hispanics and whites. However, for foreign-born Hispanics, there are some differences in the perceived value of children compared with whites, and these differences could contribute to fertility differentials.

DOI:10.1111/j.1533-8525.2012.01252.x (Full Text)

NIHMSID: NIHMS396008. (Pub Med Central)

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