Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Clinton's and Trump's appeal to voters viewed from perspective of Neidert and Lesthaeghe's SDT framework

Stephenson assessing in-home HIV testing and counseling for male couples

Thompson says mass incarceration causes collapse of Detroit neighborhoods

Highlights

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

AAUP reports on faculty compensation by category, affiliation, and academic rank

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Psychosocial Distress and Stroke Risk in Older Adults

Publication Abstract

Henderson, K., Carol A.M. Clark, T. Lewis, N. Aggarwal, T. Beck, H. Guo, S. Lunos, A. Brearley, Carlos Mendes de Leon, D. Evans, and S. Everson-Rose. 2013. "Psychosocial Distress and Stroke Risk in Older Adults." Stroke, 44(2): 367-372.

Background and Purpose-To investigate the association of psychosocial distress with risk of stroke mortality and incident stroke in older adults. Methods-Data were from the Chicago Health and Aging Project, a longitudinal population-based study conducted in 3 contiguous neighborhoods on the south side of Chicago, IL. Participants were community-dwelling black and non-Hispanic white adults, aged 65 years and older (n=4120 for stroke mortality; n=2649 for incident stroke). Psychosocial distress was an analytically derived composite measure of depressive symptoms, perceived stress, neuroticism, and life dissatisfaction. Cox proportional hazards models examined the association of distress with stroke mortality and incident stroke over 6 years of follow-up. Results-Stroke deaths (151) and 452 incident strokes were identified. Adjusting for age, race, and sex, the hazard ratio (HR) for each 1-SD increase in distress was 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.28-1.70) for stroke mortality and 1.18 (95% CI=1.07-1.30) for incident stroke. Associations were reduced after adjustment for stroke risk factors and remained significant for stroke mortality (HR=1.29; 95% CI=1.10-1.52) but not for incident stroke (HR=1.09; 95% CI=0.98-1.21). Secondary analyses of stroke subtypes showed that distress was strongly related to incident hemorrhagic strokes (HR=1.70; 95% CI=1.28-2.25) but not ischemic strokes (HR=1.02; 95% CI=0.91-1.15) in fully adjusted models. Conclusions-Increasing levels of psychosocial distress are related to excess risk of both fatal and nonfatal stroke in older black and white adults. Additional research is needed to examine pathways linking psychosocial distress to cerebrovascular disease risk. (Stroke. 2013;44:367-372.)

DOI:10.1161/strokeaha.112.679159 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3552144. (Pub Med Central)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next