Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Bleakley says reversing US trade policies could be 'recipe for slowdown'

ISR's Scott Page cited on 'bee swarm' social influence in crowd response to Trump

Novak, Geronimus, and Martinez-Cardoso find fear of immigration can affect Latino birth outcomes

More News

Highlights

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

ISR Next Generation Awards: Support for pre-docs and early-career researchers in the social sciences

Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at noon:
Daniel Almirall

Social Patterning of Cumulative Biological Risk by Education and Income Among African Americans

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Hickson, D., Ana Diez Roux, S. Gebreab, S. Wyatt, P. Dubbert, D. Sarpong, M. Sims, and H. Taylor. 2012. "Social Patterning of Cumulative Biological Risk by Education and Income Among African Americans." American Journal of Public Health, 102(7): 1362-1369.

Objectives. We examined the social patterning of cumulative dysregulation of multiple systems, or allostatic load, among African Americans adults. Methods. We examined the cross-sectional associations of socioeconomic status (SES) with summary indices of allostatic load and neuroendocrine, metabolic, autonomic, and immune function components in 4048 Jackson Heart Study participants. Results. Lower education and income were associated with higher allostatic load scores in African American adults. Patterns were most consistent for the metabolic and immune dimensions, less consistent for the autonomic dimension, and absent for the neuroendocrine dimension among African American women. Associations of SES with the global allostatic load score and the metabolic and immune domains persisted after adjustment for behavioral factors and were stronger for income than for education. There was some evidence that the neuroendocrine dimension was inversely associated with SES after behavioral adjustment in men, but the immune and autonomic components did not show clear dose response trends, and we observed no associations for the metabolic component. Conclusions. Findings support our hypothesis that allostatic load is socially patterned in African American women, but this pattern is less consistent in African American men. (Am J Public Health. 2012;102:1362-1369. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2011.300444)

DOI:10.2105/ajph.2011.300444 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3371088. (Pub Med Central)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next