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Filiz Garip, Changing Dynamics of Mexico-U.S. Migration

Variations in hypertension-related outcomes among Blacks, Whites and Hispanics in two large urban areas and in the United States

Publication Abstract

Hunte, H., G. Mentz, James S. House, A. Schulz, David R. Williams, Michael R. Elliott, Jeffrey Morenoff, and D. White-Perkins. 2012. "Variations in hypertension-related outcomes among Blacks, Whites and Hispanics in two large urban areas and in the United States." Ethnicity & Disease, 22(4): 391-7.

OBJECTIVE: This study compared the hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment and control in Chicago, Illinois and Detroit, Michigan to that of the general United States population (aged > or = 25 years) for the period 2001-2003. We examined whether and how much 1) urban populations have less favorable hypertension-related outcomes and 2) the rates of racial/ethnic minorities lag behind those of Whites in order to determine if the national data understate the magnitude of hypertension-related outcomes and racial/ethnic disparities in two large cities in the Midwestern region of the United States and perhaps others. METHODS: Unstandardized and standardized hypertension-related outcome rates were estimated. RESULTS: The hypertension-related outcomes among Chicago and Detroit residents lag behind the United States by 8%-14% and 10%-18% points, respectively. Additionally, this study highlights the complexity of the racial/ethnic differences in hypertension-related outcomes, where within each population, Blacks were more likely to have hypertension and to be aware of their hypertension status than Whites, and no less likely to be treated. Conversely, Hispanics were less likely to have hypertension and also less likely to be aware of their status when they do have hypertension when compared to Whites. CONCLUSION: At a time when efficacious treatment for hypertension has been available for more than 50 years, continued racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of hypertension is among public health's greatest challenges. To achieve the proposed national hypertension-related goals, future policies must consider the social context of hypertension within central cities of urban areas.

PMCID: PMC3579519. (Pub Med Central)

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