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Parental Religious Socialization Practices, Connectedness With Others, and Depressive Symptoms in Late Life

Publication Abstract

Krause, Neal. 2012. "Parental Religious Socialization Practices, Connectedness With Others, and Depressive Symptoms in Late Life." The International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 22(2): 135-154.

This purpose of this study is to examine two constructs that have been largely overlooked in the study of religious involvement among older people: parental religious socialization practices and feelings of connectedness with others. The data are from an ongoing nationwide survey of older people. Findings from a latent variable model that was designed to examine the two focal constructs provides support for the following relationships:(1) older people whose parents encouraged them to become more involved in religion are more likely to attend worship services; (2) older people whose parents promoted religious involvement and older individuals who attend church more often are more likely to report that they see a fundamental connection among all human beings; (3) older adults who feel more closely connected to others will be more likely to forgive people for the things they have done; and (4) older people who are more forgiving are likely to experience fewer symptoms of depression over time.

DOI:10.1080/10508619.2011.638589 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3314245. (Pub Med Central)

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