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Social Factors in the Church and Positive Religious Coping Responses: Assessing Differences Among Older Whites, Older Blacks, and Older Mexican Americans

Publication Abstract

Krause, Neal, and R. Hayward. 2012. "Social Factors in the Church and Positive Religious Coping Responses: Assessing Differences Among Older Whites, Older Blacks, and Older Mexican Americans." Review of Religious Research, 54(4): 519-541.

Findings from a growing number of studies point to the social basis of a wide range of religious beliefs and behaviors. This study has two main goals. The first is to see whether four social aspects of congregational life (church attendance, attendance at Bible study groups, attendance at prayer groups, and informal spiritual support) are associated with greater use of positive religious coping responses. The second goal is to determine if the relationships between these social aspects of the church and religious coping vary across older whites, older blacks, and older Mexican Americans. The data suggest that more frequent church attendance is associated with greater use of religious coping responses in all three groups. However, the findings further reveal that the relationship between informal spiritual support and religious coping is especially stronger among older whites. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

DOI:10.1007/s13644-012-0075-0 (Full Text)

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