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Mon, Oct 3 at noon:
Longevity, Education, & Income, Hoyt Bleakley

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Self-Forgiveness and Mortality in Late Life

Publication Abstract

Krause, Neal, and R. David Hayward. 2013. "Self-Forgiveness and Mortality in Late Life." Social Indicators Research, 111(1): 361-373.

The purpose of this study is to see if older people who are able to forgive themselves have a lower mortality risk than older adults who are not able to forgive themselves. In addition, it is hypothesized that the relationship between self-forgiveness and mortality will be contingent upon the level of an older individual's education. More specifically, it is predicted that the potentially beneficial effects of self-forgiveness will be more evident among older people with more years of schooling. Data from a nationwide survey of older people provide support for this view. Self-forgiveness does not provide a mortality benefit for less educated elders. But as the level of educational attainment rises, self-forgiveness is associated with a progressively smaller mortality risk.

DOI:10.1007/s11205-012-0010-3 (Full Text)

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