Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Work by Bailey and Dynarski cited in NYT piece on income inequality

Pfeffer says housing bubble masked decade-long growth in household net worth inequality

House, Burgard, Schoeni et al find that unemployment and recession have contrasting effects on mortality risk

Highlights

Jeff Morenoff makes Reuters' Highly Cited Researchers list for 2014

Susan Murphy named Distinguished University Professor

Sarah Burgard and former PSC trainee Jennifer Ailshire win ASA award for paper

James Jackson to be appointed to NSF's National Science Board

Next Brown Bag


PSC Brown Bags will return in the fall

Associations of Anger, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms With Carotid Arterial Wall Thickness: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Ohira, T., Ana Diez Roux, J. Polak, S. Homma, H. Iso, and B. Wasserman. 2012. "Associations of Anger, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms With Carotid Arterial Wall Thickness: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis." Psychosomatic Medicine, 74(5): 517-525.

Objective: Carotid arterial wall thickness, measured as intima-media thickness (IMT), is an early subclinical indicator of cardiovascular disease. Few studies have investigated the association of psychological factors with IMT across multiple ethnic groups and by sex. Methods: We included 6561 men and women (2541 whites, 1790 African Americans, 1436 Hispanics, and 794 Chinese) aged 45 to 84 years who took part in the first examination of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Associations of trait anger, trait anxiety, and depressive symptoms with mean values of common carotid artery (CCA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) IMTs were investigated using multivariable regression and logistic models. Results: In age-, sex-, and race/ethnicity-adjusted analyses, the trait anger score was positively associated with CCA and ICA IMTs (mean differences per 1-standard deviation increment of trait anger score were 0.014 [95% confidence interval {CI} = 0.003-0.025, p = .01] and 0.054 [95% CI 0.017-0.090, p = .004] for CCA and ICA IMTs, respectively). Anger was also associated with the presence of carotid plaque (age-, sex-, and race/ethnicity-adjusted odds ratio per 1-standard deviation increase in trait anger = 1.27 [95% CI = 1.06-1.52]). The associations of the anger score with thicker IMT were attenuated after adjustment for covariates but remained statistically significant. Associations were stronger in men than in women and in whites than in other race/ethnic groups, but heterogeneity was only marginally statistically significant by race/ethnicity. There was no association of depressive symptoms or trait anxiety with IMT. Conclusions: Only one of the three measures examined was associated with IMT, and the patterns seemed to be heterogeneous across race/ethnic groups.

DOI:10.1097/PSY.0b013e31824f6267 (Full Text)

NIHMSID: NIHMS363124. (Pub Med Central)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next