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American Muslim perceptions of healing: key agents in healing, and their roles

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Padela, Aasim, A. Killawi, J. Forman, S. DeMonner, and Michele Heisler. 2012. "American Muslim perceptions of healing: key agents in healing, and their roles." Qualitative Health Research, 22(6): 846-58.

American Muslims represent a growing and diverse community. Efforts at promoting cultural competence, enhancing cross-cultural communication skills, and improving community health must account for the religio-cultural frame through which American Muslims view healing. Using a community-based participatory research model, we conducted 13 focus groups at area mosques in southeast Michigan to explore American Muslim views on healing and to identify the primary agents, and their roles, within the healing process. Participants shared a God-centric view of healing. Healing was accessed through direct means such as supplication and recitation of the Qur'an, or indirectly through human agents including imams, health care practitioners, family, friends, and community. Human agents served integral roles, influencing spiritual, psychological, and physical health. Additional research into how religiosity, health care systems, and community factors influence health-care-seeking behaviors is warranted.

DOI:10.1177/1049732312438969 (Full Text)

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