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Sastry's 10-year study of New Orleans Katrina evacuees shows demographic differences between returning and nonreturning

Stafford says less educated, smaller investors more likely to sell off stock and lock in losses during market downturn

Chen says job fit, job happiness can be achieved over time

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Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12
Joe Grengs, Policy & Planning for Social Equity in Transportation

Racial and ethnic differences in hypertension risk: new diagnoses after age 50

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Quinones, A., Jersey Liang, and Wen Ye. 2012. "Racial and ethnic differences in hypertension risk: new diagnoses after age 50." Ethnicity & Disease, 22(2): 175-180.

Objectives: Our study examines the differences in estimated risk of developing hypertension in Whites, Blacks, and Mexican-Americans aged >= 50 for a period of 11 years. Design, Setting, and Participants: Data came from 9,259 respondents who reported being hypertension-free at the baseline in the Health and Retirement Study (FIRS) with up to five time intervals (1998-2006). Discrete-time survival models were used to analyze ethnic variations in the probability of developing hypertension. Main Outcome Measure: Estimated odds of developing hypertension. Results: The risk of newly diagnosed hypertension increased between 1 995 and 2006 for HRS participants aged >= 50. After adjusting for demographic and health status, the probability of incident hypertension among Black Americans was .10 during the period of 1995/96-1998, which increased steadily to .17 in 2004-2006, with cumulative incidence over the 11-year period at 51%. In contrast, among White Americans the risk was .07 during 1995/96-1998 and .13 in 2004-2006, with cumulative incidence at 43%. For Mexican-Americans, the probability also increased from .08 during 1995/96-1998 to .14 during 2004-2006, with cumulative incidence at 42%. Conclusions: Relative to White and Mexican-Americans, Black Americans had an elevated risk of incident hypertension throughout the 11-year period of observation. These variations persisted even when differences in health behaviors, socioeconomic status, demographic, and time-varying health characteristics were accounted for. (Ethn Dis. 2012;22(2):175-180)

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