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Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Disfluencies and Gaze Aversion in Unreliable Responses to Survey Questions

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Schober, M., Frederick G. Conrad, W. Dijkstra, and Y. Ongena. 2012. "Disfluencies and Gaze Aversion in Unreliable Responses to Survey Questions." Journal of Official Statistics, 28(4): 555-582.

When survey respondents answer survey questions, they can also produce "paradata" (Couper 2000, 2008): behavioral evidence about their response process. The study reported here demonstrates that two kinds of respondent paradata - fluency of speech and gaze direction during answers - identify answers that are likely to be problematic, as measured by changes in answers during the interview or afterward on a post-interview questionnaire. Answers with disfluencies were less reliable both face to face and on the telephone than fluent answers, and particularly diagnostic of unreliability face to face. Interviewers' responsivity can affect both the prevalence and potential diagnosticity of paradata: both disfluent speech and gaze aversion were more frequent and diagnostic in conversational interviews, where interviewers could provide clarification if respondents requested it or the interviewer judged it was needed, than in strictly standardized interviews where clarification was not provided even if the respondent asked for it.

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