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Monday, Sep 22
Paula Fomby (Michigan), Family Complexity, Siblings, and Children's Aggressive Behavior at School Entry

Two-year effects of an interdisciplinary intervention on recovery following hip fracture in older Taiwanese with cognitive impairment

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Shyu, Y., W. Tsai, M. Chen, Jersey Liang, H. Cheng, C. Wu, J. Su, and S. Chou. 2012. "Two-year effects of an interdisciplinary intervention on recovery following hip fracture in older Taiwanese with cognitive impairment." International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 27(5): 529-538.

Objective: This article aims to evaluate the long-term effects of an interdisciplinary intervention program on cognitively impaired older persons after hip fracture in Taiwan. Methods: Of 160 subjects randomly assigned to control (n = 81) and intervention (n = 79) groups, 24 (29.6%) and 27 (34.2%) were cognitively impaired in the control and intervention groups, respectively, and outcomes were followed for 2 years after discharge. Results: Among cognitively impaired subjects, more in the intervention group recovered their previous walking ability (odds ratio [OR] = 3.49; confidence interval [CI] = 1.64 to 7.42), activities of daily life performance (beta = 18.59; p = 0.0002), and more were readmitted to the hospital (OR = 4.44, CI = 1.53 to 12.89) than those in the control group during the first 2 years following discharge. Among subjects without cognitive impairment, more in the intervention group recovered their previous walking ability (OR = 2.6; CI = 1.33 to 5.07), had fewer falls (OR = 0.47; CI = 0.25 to 0.86), and made fewer emergency room visits (OR = 0.33; CI = 0.11 to 0.97) during the first 2 years following discharge than those in the control group. Conclusions: Cognitively impaired individuals benefited from our interdisciplinary intervention by improving their walking ability and physical function during the first 2 years following discharge. Specific strategies on fall prevention following hip fracture need to be further developed for cognitively impaired individuals. Copyright (C) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI:10.1002/gps.2750 (Full Text)

Country of focus: Taiwan.

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