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2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

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Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Walkable Communities and Adolescent Weight

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Slater, S., L. Nicholson, J. Chriqui, D. Barker, F. Chaloupka, and Lloyd Johnston. 2013. "Walkable Communities and Adolescent Weight." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 44(2): 164-168.

Background: Neighborhood design features have been associated with health outcomes, including the prevalence of obesity. Purpose: This study examined the association between walkability and adolescent weight in a national sample of public secondary school students and the communities in which they live. Methods: Data were collected through student surveys and community observations between February and August 2010, and analyses were conducted in Spring 2012. The sample size was 154 communities and 11,041 students. Acommunity walkability index and measures of the prevalence of adolescent overweight and obesity were constructed. Multivariable analyses from a cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of 8th-, 10th- and 12th-grade public school students in the U. S. were run. Results: The odds of students being overweight (AOR 0.98, 95% CI = 0.95, 0.99) or obese (AOR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.95, 0.99) decreased if they lived in communities with higher walkability index scores. Conclusions: Results suggest that living in more-walkable communities is associated with reduced prevalence of adolescent overweight and obesity. (Am J Prev Med 2013; 44(2): 164-168) (C) 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine

DOI:10.1016/j.amepre.2012.10.015 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3553501. (Pub Med Central)

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