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Jinkook Lee, Wellbeing of the Elderly in East Asia

When promoting a charity can hurt charitable giving: A metacognitive analysis

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Smith, R., and Norbert Schwarz. 2012. "When promoting a charity can hurt charitable giving: A metacognitive analysis." Journal of Consumer Psychology, 22(4): 558-564.

Charities need to come to mind to enter a potential donor's consideration set. However, feeling familiar with a charity and its cause can facilitate or impair giving. In most cases, perceived good memory for details of the cause fosters the impression of personal importance, which increases giving (Studies I and 3). But when the charity aims to increase awareness of a cause, good memory for the cause suggests that awareness is already high, which impairs giving (Studies 2 and 3). Hence, promotions for awareness-raising charities can actually have negative consequences, confirming the predictions of a metacognitive analysis. (C) 2012 Society for Consumer Psychology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI:10.1016/j.jcps.2012.01.001 (Full Text)

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