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Paula Fomby (Michigan), Family Complexity, Siblings, and Children's Aggressive Behavior at School Entry

Kelli Stidham Hall photo

Patterns and correlates of parental and formal sexual and reproductive health communication for adolescent women in the United States, 2002-2008

Publication Abstract

Hall, Kelli Stidham, C. Moreau, and James Trussell. 2012. "Patterns and correlates of parental and formal sexual and reproductive health communication for adolescent women in the United States, 2002-2008." Journal of Adolescent Health, 50(4): 410-3.

PURPOSE: To investigate patterns and correlates of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) communication among adolescent women in the United States between 2002 and 2008. METHODS: We used data with regard to adolescent women (aged 15-19 years) from the National Survey of Family Growth (between 2002 and 2006-2008, n = 2,326). Multivariate analyses focused on sociodemographic characteristics and SRH communication from parental and formal sources. RESULTS: Seventy-five percent of adolescent women had received parental communication on abstinence (60%), contraception (56%), sexually transmitted infections (53%), and condoms (29%); 9% received abstinence-only communication. Formal communication (92%) included abstinence (87%) and contraceptive (71%) information; 66% received both, whereas 21% received abstinence-only. Between 2002 and 2006-2008, parental (not formal) communication increased (7%, p < .001), including the abstinence communication (4%, p = .03). Age, sexual experience, education, mother's education, and poverty were positively associated with SRH communication. CONCLUSIONS: Between 2002 and 2008, receipt of parental SRH communication, especially abstinence, was increasingly common among United States adolescents. Strategies to promote comprehensive communication may improve adolescents' SRH outcomes.

DOI:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2011.06.007 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3792015. (Pub Med Central)

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