Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Stephenson says homophobia among gay men raises risk of intimate partner violence

Frey says having more immigrants with higher birth rates fills need in the US

Inglehart's work on the rise of populism cited in NYT

More News

Highlights

Savolainen wins Outstanding Contribution Award for study of how employment affects recidivism among past criminal offenders

Giving Blueday at ISR focuses on investing in the next generation of social scientists

Pfeffer and Schoeni cover the economic and social dimensions of wealth inequality in this special issue

PRB Policy Communication Training Program for PhD students in demography, reproductive health, population health

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Social connectedness and disease transmission: social organization, cohesion, village context, and infection risk in rural Ecuador

Publication Abstract

Zelner, J., J. Trostle, J. Goldstick, W. Cevallos, James S. House, and J. Eisenberg. 2012. "Social connectedness and disease transmission: social organization, cohesion, village context, and infection risk in rural Ecuador." American Journal of Public Health, 102(12): 2233-9.

Social networks are typically seen as conduits for the spread of disease and disease risk factors. However, social relationships also reduce the incidence of chronic disease and potentially infectious diseases. Seldom are these opposing effects considered simultaneously. We have shown how and why diarrheal disease spreads more slowly to and in rural Ecuadorian villages that are more remote from the area's population center. Reduced contact with outside individuals partially accounts for remote villages' relatively lower prevalence of diarrheal disease. But equally or more important is the greater density of social ties between individuals in remote communities, which facilitates the spread of individual and collective practices that reduce the transmission of diarrheal disease.

DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2012.300795 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3519324. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: Ecuador.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next