Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Lam says tightening global labor market good for American workers

Johnston says e-cigs may reverse two-decades of progress on smoking reduction

Mueller-Smith finds incarceration increases the likelihood of committing more, and more serious, crimes

Highlights

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Elizabeth Bruch wins ASA award for paper in mathematical sociology

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags will be back fall 2015


Early mortality and years of potential life lost among Veterans Affairs patients with depression

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Zivin, Kara, M. Ilgen, P. Pfeiffer, D. Welsh, J. McCarthy, M. Valenstein, E. Miller, K. Islam, and H. Kales. 2012. "Early mortality and years of potential life lost among Veterans Affairs patients with depression." Psychiatric Services, 63(8): 823-6.

OBJECTIVE: Substantial literature documents excess and early mortality among individuals with serious mental illness, but there are relatively few data about mortality and depression. METHODS: During fiscal year 2007, data from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the National Death Index were used to calculate mean age of death and years of potential life lost (YPLL) associated with 13 causes of death among veterans with (N=701,659) or without (N=4,245,193) depression. RESULTS: Compared with nondepressed patients, depressed patients died younger (71.1 versus 75.9) and had more YPLL (13.4 versus 10.2) as a result of both natural and unnatural causes. Depending on the cause of death, depressed patients died between 2.5 and 8.7 years earlier and had 1.5 to 6.1 YPLL compared with nondepressed patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings have important implications for clinical practice, given that improved quality of care may be needed to reduce early mortality among depressed VA patients.

DOI:10.1176/appi.ps.201100317 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next