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The Impact of Education on Intergroup Attitudes: A Multiracial Analysis

Publication Abstract

Wodtke, Geoffrey. 2012. "The Impact of Education on Intergroup Attitudes: A Multiracial Analysis." Social Psychology Quarterly, 75(1): 80-106.

How does education affect racial attitudes? Past studies focus almost exclusively on whites' attitudes toward blacks, neglecting important minority populations. This study extends previous research by analyzing the effects of education on beliefs about racial stereotypes, discrimination, and affirmative action policies among whites, Asians, Hispanics, and blacks. Results indicate that whites, Hispanics, and blacks with higher levels of education are more likely to reject negative stereotypes, but these effects are less consistent among Asians. And, although education has consistent positive effects on awareness of discrimination against minorities, a more advanced education is not associated with greater support for racial preferences among any respondent group. Education is, however, related to more favorable attitudes toward race-targeted job training. These results are partly consistent with a revised group conflict perspective positing that education unevenly promotes different elements of the dominant racial ideology among nonwhite minorities, depending on their position in the racial hierarchy.

DOI:10.1177/0190272511430234 (Full Text)

NIHMSID: NIHMS536241. (Pub Med Central)

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