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Racial/ethnic disparities in infant mortality among US Latinos: a test of the segmented racialization hypothesis

Publication Abstract

Henry-Sanchez, Brenda, and Arline T. Geronimus. 2013. "Racial/ethnic disparities in infant mortality among US Latinos: a test of the segmented racialization hypothesis." Du Bois Review, 10(1): 205-231.

Despite shared colonization histories between the United States and Latin America, research examining racial disparities in health in the United States has often neglected Latinos. Additionally, descendants from Latin America residing in the United States are often categorized under the pan-ethnic label of Hispanic or Latino. This categorization obscures the group's heterogeneity, which is illuminated by research showing consistent differences in health for the three largest segments of the Latino population—Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans. We examine whether the patterns of infant mortality associated with race in the non-Latino population also follow for Latinos. We also examine whether we can attribute patterns of infant mortality between the three largest Latino sub-groups to a process we term segmented racialization. We find that race operates for Latinos the same way it does for the non-Latino population and that there seems to be some evidence to support our segmented racialization hypothesis. The results point to the need to abandon the practices of combining Latino sub-groups as well as ignoring the racial diversity within the Latino population in health research.

DOI:10.1017/S1742058X13000064 (Full Text)

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