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COSSA makes 10 suggestions to next Administration for supporting and using social science research

Thompson says US prison population is 'staggeringly high' at about 1.5 million, despite 2% drop for 2015

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2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

Russell Sage 2-week workshop on social science genomics, June 11-23, 2017, Santa Barbara

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Families, neighborhood socio-demographic factors, and violent behaviors among Latino, white, and black adolescents

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Estrada-Martínez, Lorena M., Cleopatra Howard Caldwell, Amy Jo Schulz, Ana Diez Roux, and Silvia Pedraza. 2013. "Families, neighborhood socio-demographic factors, and violent behaviors among Latino, white, and black adolescents." Youth and Society, 45(2): 221-242.

Youth violence is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among Blacks and Latinos. Violent behaviors within Latino subgroups and the reasons for subgroup differences are not well understood. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 16,615), this study examined the risk for violent behaviors among an ethnically diverse sample of youth, with special attention to different Latino subgroups. Family dynamics were examined as moderators between neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and violent behaviors who lived in neighborhoods with different racial/ethnic compositions. Results indicated that neighborhood SES was positively associated with risk for violent behaviors among youth living in predominately Black and Latino neighborhoods, but negatively in predominately White neighborhoods. Additionally, family cohesion, parental engagement, and adolescent autonomy differentially impacted the relationship between neighborhood SES and youth violent behaviors for youth living in predominately Latino neighborhoods.

DOI:10.1177/0044118X11411933 (Full Text)

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