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Families, neighborhood socio-demographic factors, and violent behaviors among Latino, white, and black adolescents

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Estrada-Martínez, Lorena M., Cleopatra Howard Caldwell, Amy Jo Schulz, Ana Diez Roux, and Silvia Pedraza. 2013. "Families, neighborhood socio-demographic factors, and violent behaviors among Latino, white, and black adolescents." Youth & Society, 45(2): 221-242.

Youth violence is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among Blacks and Latinos. Violent behaviors within Latino subgroups and the reasons for subgroup differences are not well understood. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 16,615), this study examined the risk for violent behaviors among an ethnically diverse sample of youth, with special attention to different Latino subgroups. Family dynamics were examined as moderators between neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and violent behaviors who lived in neighborhoods with different racial/ethnic compositions. Results indicated that neighborhood SES was positively associated with risk for violent behaviors among youth living in predominately Black and Latino neighborhoods, but negatively in predominately White neighborhoods. Additionally, family cohesion, parental engagement, and adolescent autonomy differentially impacted the relationship between neighborhood SES and youth violent behaviors for youth living in predominately Latino neighborhoods.

DOI:10.1177/0044118X11411933 (Full Text)

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