Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Cheng finds marriage may not be best career option for women

Lam discusses youth population dynamics and economics in sub-Saharan Africa

Work by Bailey and Dynarski cited in NYT piece on income inequality

Highlights

Jeff Morenoff makes Reuters' Highly Cited Researchers list for 2014

Susan Murphy named Distinguished University Professor

Sarah Burgard and former PSC trainee Jennifer Ailshire win ASA award for paper

James Jackson to be appointed to NSF's National Science Board

Next Brown Bag


PSC Brown Bags will return in the fall

Vascular health, diabetes, APOE and dementia: the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Llewellyn, David J., Iain A. Lang, Fiona E. Matthews, Brenda L. Plassman, Mary A. M. Rogers, Lewis B. Morgenstern, Gwenith Fisher, Mohammed U. Kabeto, and Kenneth M. Langa. 2010. "Vascular health, diabetes, APOE and dementia: the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study." Alzheimers Research & Therapy, 2(3): 19.

Introduction: Evidence from clinical samples and geographically limited population studies suggests that vascular health, diabetes and apolipoprotein epsilon 4 (APOE) are associated with dementia.

Methods: A population-based sample of 856 individuals aged 71 years or older from all contiguous regions of the United States received an extensive in-home clinical and neuropsychological assessment in 2001-2003. The relation of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, medication usage, and APOE epsilon 4 to dementia was modelled using adjusted multivariable logistic regression.

Results: Treated stroke (odds ratio [OR] 3.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.0, 7.2), untreated stroke (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.7, 7.3), and APOE epsilon 4 (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.7, 4.5) all increased the odds of dementia. Treated hypertension was associated with lower odds of dementia (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3, 1.0). Diabetes and heart disease were not significantly associated with dementia. A significant interaction was observed between APOE epsilon 4 and stroke (P = 0.001).

Conclusions: Data from the first dementia study that is representative of the United States population suggest that stroke, the APOE epsilon 4 allele and their interaction are strongly associated with dementia.

DOI:10.1186/alzrt43 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2919699. (Pub Med Central)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next