Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Shaefer says drop child tax credit in favor of universal, direct investment in American children

Buchmueller breaks down partisan views on Obamacare

ISR's Conrad says mobile phone polling faces non-response bias

More News


Gonzalez, Alter, and Dinov win NSF "Big Data Spokes" award for neuroscience network

Post-doc Melanie Wasserman wins dissertation award from Upjohn Institute

ISR kicks off DE&I initiative with lunchtime presentation: Oct 13, noon, 1430 ISR Thompson

U-M ranked #4 in USN&WR's top public universities

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Oct 24 at noon:
Academic innovation & the global public research university, James Hilton

Vascular health, diabetes, APOE and dementia: the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Llewellyn, David J., Iain A. Lang, Fiona E. Matthews, Brenda L. Plassman, Mary A. M. Rogers, Lewis B. Morgenstern, Gwenith Fisher, Mohammed U. Kabeto, and Kenneth M. Langa. 2010. "Vascular health, diabetes, APOE and dementia: the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study." Alzheimers Research and Therapy, 2(3): 19.

Introduction: Evidence from clinical samples and geographically limited population studies suggests that vascular health, diabetes and apolipoprotein epsilon 4 (APOE) are associated with dementia.

Methods: A population-based sample of 856 individuals aged 71 years or older from all contiguous regions of the United States received an extensive in-home clinical and neuropsychological assessment in 2001-2003. The relation of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, medication usage, and APOE epsilon 4 to dementia was modelled using adjusted multivariable logistic regression.

Results: Treated stroke (odds ratio [OR] 3.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.0, 7.2), untreated stroke (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.7, 7.3), and APOE epsilon 4 (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.7, 4.5) all increased the odds of dementia. Treated hypertension was associated with lower odds of dementia (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3, 1.0). Diabetes and heart disease were not significantly associated with dementia. A significant interaction was observed between APOE epsilon 4 and stroke (P = 0.001).

Conclusions: Data from the first dementia study that is representative of the United States population suggest that stroke, the APOE epsilon 4 allele and their interaction are strongly associated with dementia.

DOI:10.1186/alzrt43 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC2919699. (Pub Med Central)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next