Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Pfeffer says housing bubble masked decade-long growth in household net worth inequality

House, Burgard, Schoeni et al find that unemployment and recession have contrasting effects on mortality risk

Smock says cohabitation does not reduce odds of marriage

Highlights

Jeff Morenoff makes Reuters' Highly Cited Researchers list for 2014

Susan Murphy named Distinguished University Professor

Sarah Burgard and former PSC trainee Jennifer Ailshire win ASA award for paper

James Jackson to be appointed to NSF's National Science Board

Next Brown Bag


PSC Brown Bags will return in the fall

Sarah Burgard photo

Working Conditions and Depressive Symptoms: A Prospective Study of US Adults

Publication Abstract

Burgard, Sarah, Michael R. Elliott, Kara Zivin, and James S. House. 2013. "Working Conditions and Depressive Symptoms: A Prospective Study of US Adults." Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 55(9): 1007-14.

OBJECTIVE: Prior longitudinal studies of negative working conditions and depression generally have used a single exposure indicator, such as job strain, and have required consistent availability of the measure across waves and selection of only those working at all measurement points. METHODS: Up to four waves of the Americans' Changing Lives study (1986 to 2001/2) and item-response theory (IRT) models were used to generate wave-specific measures of negative working conditions. Random-intercept linear mixed models assessed the association between the score and depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Adjusting for covariates, negative working conditions were associated with significantly greater depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: A summary score of negative working conditions allowed the use of all available working conditions measures and predicted depressive symptoms in a nationally representative sample of US workers observed for up to 15 years. Linear mixed models also allowed retention of intermittent workers.

DOI:10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182a299af (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3951142. (Pub Med Central)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next