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Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

COSSA makes 10 suggestions to next Administration for supporting and using social science research

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2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

Russell Sage 2-week workshop on social science genomics, June 11-23, 2017, Santa Barbara

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Daniel J. Kruger photo

Was that Cheating? Perceptions Vary by Sex, Attachment Anxiety, and Behavior

Publication Abstract

Kruger, Daniel J., M. Fisher, R. Edelstein, W. Chopik, C. Fitzgerald, and S. Strout. 2013. "Was that Cheating? Perceptions Vary by Sex, Attachment Anxiety, and Behavior." Evolutionary Psychology, 11(1): 159-171.

We generated an inventory of 27 interpersonal behaviors and examined the extent to which participants judged each behavior as cheating on a long-term partner. We predicted variation in these judgments based on participant sex and attachment insecurity. Ratings for items ranged considerably; participants rated sexual behaviors as most indicative of cheating, then erotic behaviors, followed by behaviors consistent with a romantic relationship, and then behaviors related to financial support. Women rated ten items higher than did men, and men's ratings were higher on a minor financial support item. Higher attachment anxiety was associated with higher ratings for 18 of 27 behaviors; higher attachment avoidance was associated with lower scores on five items and higher scores on one item. Principle Axis Factoring identified three dimensions; sexual interaction, behaviors indicating close relationships, and casual social interaction. We discuss these results using the framework of attachment theory and sex-specific mating strategies.

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