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Influence of Family Planning Programs on Transition to Motherhood among Women in Shifting County, Sichuan, China

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Wang, Jichuan. "Influence of Family Planning Programs on Transition to Motherhood among Women in Shifting County, Sichuan, China." PSC Research Report No. 91-203. March 1991.

The author conducted dynamic studies on the process of transition to marriage and motherhood in a Chinese local population of Shifang County, Sichuan, China. Cox's partial hazard model is used to shrink the three-dimensional conceptual framework of the analysis into a two-dimensional study (only individual characteristics and historical social structure are taken into account). Time-varying period codings are used to evaluate the effect of various population policies implemented in different time periods on individual marriage and childbearing. The findings show that program intervention on transition to marriage substantially diminished and control over marital fertility in early duration of marriage was simply ignored during the well-known "One-Child Policy" period (1979-83), particularly after the population policy was relaxed in 1984. Considering that second baby boom women (born in late 1960) are currently at risk of marriage and childbearing, the author suggests that late marriage and late childbearing should be closely coordinated with limiting number of births in China's family planning programs, as they were in the middle and late 1970s, without stressing the one and ignoring the others.

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