Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Hindustan Times points out high value of H-1B visas for US innovation, welfare, and tech firm profits

Novak, Geronimus, Martinez-Cardoso: Threat of deportation harmful to immigrants' health

Students from two worlds learn from one another in Morenoff's Inside-Out class

More News

Highlights

Heather Ann Thompson wins Pulitzer Prize for book on Attica uprising

Lam explores dimensions of the projected 4 billion increase in world population before 2100

ISR's Nick Prieur wins UMOR award for exceptional contribution to U-M's research mission

How effectively can these nations handle outside investments in health R&D?

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, April 10, 2017, noon:
Elizabeth Bruch

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Extended Household Transitions in Early Childhood

Publication Abstract

Mollborn, Stefanie, Paula Fomby, and Jeffrey A. Dennis. 2012. "Racial/Ethnic Differences in Extended Household Transitions in Early Childhood." Social Science Research, 41(5): 1152-1165.

Beyond mothers' union status transitions, other adults' transitions into and out of the household contribute to family instability, particularly in early childhood. Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (N ≅ 8550), this study examines associations between extended household transitions and age 2 cognitive development. A substantial minority of toddlers experiences these transitions, and their consequences vary by household member type, entry versus exit, and race/ethnicity. Extended household transitions predict lower cognitive scores for white children, but the selection of low-socioeconomic status families into extended households explains these disparities. Grandparent transitions predict significantly higher cognitive scores for African American and Latino children than whites, and some "other adult" transitions predict higher scores for Latinos than African Americans and whites. Extended household transitions' consequences are independent of co-occurring residential moves and partner transitions. Findings suggest that studying extended household transitions is useful for understanding children's early development, and their consequences vary by race/ethnicity.

DOI:10.1016/j.ssresearch.2012.04.002 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next