Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Prescott says sex offender registries may increase recidivism by making offender re-assimilation impossible

Frey says rising numbers of younger minority voters mean Republicans must focus on fiscal not social issues

Work by Garces and Mickey-Pabello cited in NYT piece on lack of black physicians

Highlights

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Elizabeth Bruch wins ASA award for paper in mathematical sociology

Spring 2015 PSC newletter available now

Formal demography workshop and conference at UC Berkeley, August 17-21

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags will be back fall 2015


Javier Rodriguez photo

US Infant Mortality and the President’s Party

Publication Abstract

Rodriguez, Javier, John Bound, and Arline T. Geronimus. 2014. "US Infant Mortality and the President’s Party." International Journal of Epidemiology, 43(3): 818-26.

Infant mortality rates in the US exceed those in all other developed countries and in many less developed countries, suggesting political factors may contribute. Using annual time series on overall White and Black infant mortality rates in the US 1965–2010, we examined whether infant mortality rates varied across U.S. presidential administrations. Data were de-trended using cubic splines and analyzed using both graphical and time series regression methods. We found that, across all nine presidential administrations, infant mortality rates were below trend when the President was a Democrat and above trend when the President was a Republican. This was true for overall, neonatal and postneonatal mortality. Regression estimates show that, relative to trend, Republican administrations were characterized by infant mortality rates that were, on average, 3% higher than Democratic administrations. In proportional terms, effect size is similar for US Whites and Blacks. US Black rates are more than twice as high as White, implying substantially larger absolute effects for Blacks.

DOI:10.1093/ije/dyt252 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC4052132. (Pub Med Central)

Licensed Access Link

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next