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Kimball's failed replication of Reinhart-Rogoff finding cited in argument for tempered public response to social science research results

Sastry's 10-year study of New Orleans Katrina evacuees shows demographic differences between returning and nonreturning

Stafford says less educated, smaller investors more likely to sell off stock and lock in losses during market downturn

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Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12
Joe Grengs, Policy & Planning for Social Equity in Transportation

Racial-Ethnic Differences in Subjective Survival Expectations for the Retirement Years

Publication Abstract

Bulanda, Jennifer Roebuck, and Zhenmei Zhang. 2009. "Racial-Ethnic Differences in Subjective Survival Expectations for the Retirement Years." Research on Aging, 31(6): 688-709.

Prior research finds a race anomaly in subjective life expectancy such that Blacks expect to live longer than Whites even though their actual life expectancy is lower, but it does not include other racial-ethnic groups. Using data from the 1998 Health and Retirement Study (n = 8,077), the authors find that the race anomaly in subjective survival expectations can be extended to Mexican Americans: Mexican Americans, regardless of their nativity, expect a lower chance of living to ages 75 and 85 than do Whites net of age and gender even though their actual life expectancy is higher. In addition, foreign-born Mexican Americans expect a lower chance of survival to older ages than native-born Mexican Americans, which is also opposite of actual mortality patterns. We also find that education and wealth interact with race-ethnicity to influence subjective survival expectations.

DOI:10.1177/0164027509343533 (Full Text)

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