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Mon, April 10, 2017, noon:
Elizabeth Bruch

Do Child Care Costs Influence Women's Work Plans? Analysis for a Metropolitan Area

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Duberstein, Laura, and Karen Oppenheim Mason. "Do Child Care Costs Influence Women's Work Plans? Analysis for a Metropolitan Area." PSC Research Report No. 91-222. 7 1991.

Using data from the 1986 Detroit Child Care Study (a probability sample of mothers of preschool-aged children), this paper investigates the impact of the costs of non-maternal child care on women's employment plans. The work plan decision is believed to be based on the expected monetary costs of non-maternal child care, the woman's expected wage level, the economic pressure for her employment, and her commitment to or "taste" for market as opposed to domestic work. The results of the analysis show that child care costs have a negative relationship to planning to work one year hence. Other economic considerations and normative expectations also influence women's employment plans.

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