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Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Do Child Care Costs Influence Women's Work Plans? Analysis for a Metropolitan Area

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Duberstein, Laura, and Karen Oppenheim Mason. "Do Child Care Costs Influence Women's Work Plans? Analysis for a Metropolitan Area." PSC Research Report No. 91-222. 7 1991.

Using data from the 1986 Detroit Child Care Study (a probability sample of mothers of preschool-aged children), this paper investigates the impact of the costs of non-maternal child care on women's employment plans. The work plan decision is believed to be based on the expected monetary costs of non-maternal child care, the woman's expected wage level, the economic pressure for her employment, and her commitment to or "taste" for market as opposed to domestic work. The results of the analysis show that child care costs have a negative relationship to planning to work one year hence. Other economic considerations and normative expectations also influence women's employment plans.

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