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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Neal Krause photo

Religious Music and Health in Late Life: A Longitudinal Investigation

Publication Abstract

Krause, Neal, and R. David Hayward. 2014. "Religious Music and Health in Late Life: A Longitudinal Investigation." International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 24(1): 47-63.

Listening to religious music is often an important part of religious life. Yet there has been little empirical research on it. The purpose of this study is to test a conceptual model that specifies one way in which religious music may be associated with change in health over time. This model contains the following core relationships: (a) People who attend worship services more often will have stronger emotional reactions to religious music, (b) individuals who are more emotionally involved in religious music will be more likely to feel a close sense of connectedness with other people, (c) people who feel more closely connected with others will be more hopeful about the future, and (d) individuals who feel more hopeful will be more likely to rate their health favorably over time. The data provide support for each of these relationships. Significant variations by race were also observed in the findings.

DOI:10.1080/10508619.2012.761529 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3867015. (Pub Med Central)

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