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Does self-management counseling in patients with heart failure improve quality of life? Findings from the Heart Failure Adherence and Retention Trial (HART)

Publication Abstract

Grady, Kathleen L., Carlos Mendes de Leon, Andrea T. Kozak, John F. Cursio, DeJuran Richardson, Elizabeth Avery, James E. Calvin, and Lynda H. Powell. 2014. "Does self-management counseling in patients with heart failure improve quality of life? Findings from the Heart Failure Adherence and Retention Trial (HART)." Quality of Life Research, 23(1): 31-38.

Purpose: Heart failure (HF) is associated with poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The purpose of our study is to determine the effect of a self-management intervention on HRQOL domains across time, overall, and in prespecified demographic, clinical, and psychosocial subgroups of HF patients. Methods: HART was a single-center, multi-hospital randomized trial. Patients (n = 902) were randomized either to a self-management intervention with provision of HF educational information or an enhanced education control group which received the same HF educational materials. HRQOL was measured by the Quality of Life Index, Cardiac Version, modified, and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey physical functioning scale. Analyses included descriptive statistics and mixed-effects regression models. Results: In general, overall, study participants' HRQOL improved over time. However, no significant differences in HRQOL domain were detected between treatment groups at baseline or across time (p > 0.05). Subgroup analyses demonstrated no differences by treatment arm for change in HRQOL from baseline to 3 years later. Conclusions: We conclude that in our cohort of patients, the self-management intervention had no benefit over enhanced education in improving domains of HRQOL and HRQOL for specified HF subgroups. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

DOI:10.1007/s11136-013-0432-7 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3825836. (Pub Med Central)

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