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Monofilament insensitivity and small and large nerve fiber symptoms in impaired fasting glucose

Publication Abstract

Ylitalo, Kelly R., William H. Herman, and Sioban D. Harlow. 2013. "Monofilament insensitivity and small and large nerve fiber symptoms in impaired fasting glucose." Primary Care Diabetes, 7(4): 309-313.

Aims: To determine if diabetes or pre-diabetes is associated with monofilament insensitivity and peripheral neuropathy symptoms. The 10-g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test and Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument symptom questionnaire were administered to participants in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation-Michigansite (n = 396).We determined the con-cordance of monofilament insensitivity and symptoms and used chi-square tests, ANOVA, and logistic regression to quantify the relationships among diabetes status, monofilament insensitivity and symptoms. Results: The prevalence of monofilament insensitivity was 14.3% and 19.4% of women reported symptoms of peripheral neuropathy.With monofilament testing, 11.7% of women with normal fasting glucose, 14.4% of women with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and 18.3% of women with diabetes had monofilament in sensitivity (p-value=0.33).For symptoms, 14.0% of women with normal fasting glucose, 16.5% of women with IFG and 31.2% of women with diabetes reported symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Women who reported symptoms of small fiber nerve dysfunction alone were unlikely to have monofilament insensitivity. Compared to women with normal fasting glucose, women with diabetes were more likely to report peripheral neuropathy symptoms [OR 2.8 (95% CI: 1.5, 5.1)].Women with diabetes were also more likely to report symptoms than women with IFG (p = 0.02).There was no difference in the frequency of symptoms between women with normal fasting glucose and IFG. Conclusions: Women with diabetes were more likely to report peripheral neuropathy symptoms. The prevalence of monofilament insensitivity and peripheral neuropathy symptoms did not differ between women with normal fasting glucose and IFG. © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI:10.1016/j.pcd.2013.07.001 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC4015461. (Pub Med Central)

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