Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Thompson says criminal justice policies led to creation of prison gangs like Aryan Brotherhood

Schmitz finds job loss before retirement age contributes to weight gain, especially in men

Kimball says Fed should get comfortable with "backtracking"

Highlights

Overview of Michigan's advanced research computing resources, Monday, June 27, 9-10:30 am, BSRB - Kahn Auditorium

U-M's Data Science Initiative offers expanded consulting services via CSCAR

Elizabeth Bruch promoted to Associate Professor

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Patrick M. O'Malley photo

Driving After Drug or Alcohol Use by US High School Seniors, 2001-2011

Publication Abstract

O'Malley, Patrick M., and Lloyd Johnston. 2013. "Driving After Drug or Alcohol Use by US High School Seniors, 2001-2011." American Journal of Public Health, 103(11): 2027-2034.

Objectives. We examined prevalence, trends, and correlates of driving or riding after use of drugs or alcohol among US high school seniors from 2001 to 2011.

Methods. Data come from Monitoring the Future, an annual survey of nationally representative samples of high school seniors. We used logistic regressions with data from more than 22 000 respondents to examine multivariate associations with demographic and lifestyle factors.

Results. Large numbers of US high school seniors put themselves and others at great risk of harm by driving after using marijuana or other illicit drugs or drinking alcohol or by riding in a vehicle whose driver had used marijuana, other illicit drugs, or alcohol. Driving after drinking has declined in recent years, but driving after use of marijuana has increased. A higher percentage of students reported driving after using marijuana than after having 5 or more alcoholic drinks. Risky driving and riding behaviors differed little between demographic subgroups but considerably according to lifestyle factors.

Conclusions. Stronger efforts are needed to combat adolescent driving under the influence of illicit drugs.

DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2013.301246 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC3828684. (Pub Med Central)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next