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Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12
Joe Grengs, Policy & Planning for Social Equity in Transportation

Colter Mitchell photo

Genetic Differential Sensitivity to Social Environments: Implications for Research

Publication Abstract

Mitchell, Colter, Sara McLanahan, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Irwin Garfinkel, John Hobcraft, and Daniel Notterman. 2013. "Genetic Differential Sensitivity to Social Environments: Implications for Research." American Journal of Public Health, 103(Supp 1): 102-110.

Researchers have proposed a genetic differential sensitivity to social environmental (GDSE) model positing that individuals with certain genetic makeups are more sensitive to favorable and unfavorable environmental influences than those without these genetic makeups. We discuss several issues facing researchers who want to use GDSE to examine health: (1) the need for greater theorizing about the social environment to properly understand the size and direction of environmental influences; (2) the potential for combining multiple genetic markers to measure an individual's genetic sensitivity to environmental influence; (3) how this model and exogenous shocks deal with gene-environment correlations; (4) implications of this model for public health and prevention; and (5) how life course and developmental theories may be used to inform GDSE research.

DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2013.301382 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC4012542. (Pub Med Central)

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