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H. Luke Shaefer

Cross national comparisons across low, middle and high income countries of poor early life nutrition and diet and older adult diabetes and heart disease

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

McEniry, Mary. 2014. "Cross national comparisons across low, middle and high income countries of poor early life nutrition and diet and older adult diabetes and heart disease." In Cairo+20: Perspectives from the population and sustainable development agenda post-2014 edited by Laura Rodríguez Wong, José Eustáquio Alves, Jorge Rodríguez Vignoli, Cássio MaldonadoTurra. ALAP.

In some developing countries the particular nature of the mortality decline during the 1930s-1960s produced a unique cohort of individuals comprised of an increasing pool of infants and children who survived poor early life conditions. Infant and child mortality rapidly decreased due to massive improvements in public health measures and medical technology but many infants and children continued to be exposed to stagnant economic conditions. This cohort is most at risk of having been affected by harsh early childhood experiences and, simultaneously, having had larger probabilities of surviving; they are less affected by mortality-driven selection than the group of cohorts that preceded them. A large group of individuals within this cohort may now be at higher risk of poor health as they age due to these early life circumstances. This may be particularly evident in the Latin American and Caribbean region. Using cross national data on older adults, this paper examines the degree to which this conjecture has merit for heart disease and diabetes.

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