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Mon, April 10, 2017, noon:
Elizabeth Bruch

Targeting Girls' Education: Gender Targeting on Enrollment, Retention, and Learning in Rural Rajasthan

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionDelavallade, Clara, Alan Griffith, Gaurav Shukla, and Rebecca L. Thornton. 2014. "Targeting Girls' Education: Gender Targeting on Enrollment, Retention, and Learning in Rural Rajasthan." PSC Research Report No. 14-821. 6 2014.

Utilizing a randomized experiment in rural Rajasthan, India, we evaluate the effectiveness of an education program aimed to increase girls' retention, enrollment and learning. While enrollment and community sensitization were specifically aimed at promoting girls education, the learning component of the program involved and targeted boys and girls equally. Approximately 230 primary schools were randomly assigned to the program or to a control and we evaluate the effect after two years of program implementation. We find moderate gains in retention and enrollment after one year of the program, primarily among girls who are most likely to be disadvantaged. After the completion of the second year of the program, we find large gains in learning in Hindi, English, and Math, equivalent to approximately one additional year of schooling with no significant difference in learning across gender.

Country of focus: India.

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