Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Burgard and Seelye find job insecurity linked to psychological distress among workers in later years

Former PSC trainee Jay Borchert parlays past incarceration and doctoral degree into pursuing better treatment of inmates

Inglehart says shaky job market for millennials has contributed to their disaffection

More News

Highlights

Savolainen wins Outstanding Contribution Award for study of how employment affects recidivism among past criminal offenders

Giving Blueday at ISR focuses on investing in the next generation of social scientists

Pfeffer and Schoeni cover the economic and social dimensions of wealth inequality in this special issue

PRB Policy Communication Training Program for PhD students in demography, reproductive health, population health

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Yu Xie photo

Sex-Typing of Occupational Choice: A Test of Role Model Theory

Publication Abstract

Xie, Yu, and Kimberlee Akin. "Sex-Typing of Occupational Choice: A Test of Role Model Theory." PSC Research Report No. 92-243. July 1992.

This research examines the future occupational plans of young women as compared to those of young men within the framework of a redefinition of role model theory. We explore the influence of the societal make up of an occupation on youth's desires to train for and enter that occupation through three hypothesized channels: (1) the actual sex-segregation of occupation in the labor force (the Reflection Effect); (2) the cross-occupational variation in pay equity between female and male workers (the Anticipation Effect); and (3) the cross-occupational variation in the proportion of successful female workers (the Emulation Effect). The hypotheses are tested against data from a nationally representative survey of high school seniors in 1972 and from the 1970 U.S. Census. We find substantial evidence for the Reflection Effect and some evidence for the Emulation Effect, but none for the Anticipation Effect. We further corroborate our findings by comparing the predicted changes in sex-typing of occupations as induced by the compositional changes of role models against the observed changes between 1972 and 1979.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next