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The Family Contexts of Marriage Timing: Women's Entry into First Marriage in a Central Himalayan Village of Nepal

Publication Abstract

Dahal, Dilli R., Tom E. Fricke, and Arland Thornton. "The Family Contexts of Marriage Timing: Women's Entry into First Marriage in a Central Himalayan Village of Nepal." PSC Research Report No. 93-284. August 1993.

Using data from ethnographic and survey fieldwork in a Tamang- Ghale village of North Central Nepal, this paper explores the impact of relations organized by parental marriages on the timing of their daughters' marriages.

Multivariate event history analysis shows that, controlling for the effects of mother's characteristics and parental marriage characteristics, politically dominant clan members tend to negotiate earlier marriages for their daughters than do members of subordinate clans. Women whose parents are cross- cousins and those whose parents have greater landholdings than their affines, on the other hand, are more likely to delay their marriages. These findings support arguments which implicate parental strategies of social reproduction in the explanation of women's marriage ages in alliance settings. The analysis contributes to theories of demographic behavior as well as illustrating the application of event history analysis methods to anthropological data.

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