Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Surprising findings on what influences unintended pregnancy from Wise, Geronimus and Smock

Recommendations on how to reduce discrimination resulting from ban-the-box policies cite Starr's work

Brian Jacob on NAEP scores: "Michigan is the only state in the country where proficiency rates have actually declined over time."

More News

Highlights

Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, March 13, 2017, noon:
Rachel Best

Yu Xie photo

Sex Differences in Research Productivity: Solving the Puzzle?

Publication Abstract

Xie, Yu, and Kimberlee Akin. "Sex Differences in Research Productivity: Solving the Puzzle?" PSC Research Report No. 94-322. 10 1994.

Numerous studies have found that female scientists publish at slower rates than male scientists. So far, explanations for this consistent pattern remain elusive. This paper reports some empirical findings of a detailed analysis of data from three large, nationally representative surveys of postsecondary faculty in 1969, 1972, and 1988. Based on a series of hierarchical, multivariate Poisson-rate models, our statistical results clearly show that observed sex differences in research productivity can be attributed to sex differences in personal characteristics, structural positions, and facilitating resources. We interpret the results to mean that sex differences in research productivity seem to stem from sex differences in career tracks and access to resources rather than sex differences in role performance. For scientists of identical characteristics (except for sex) in identical positions and with identical resources, differences in research productivity between men and women are nil or negligibly small.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next