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Mon, March 23
Lundberg, State Care of the Elderly & Labor Supply of Adult Children

Mick P. Couper photo

How Does Race Matter in Housing? Projected Mobility, Search, and Preferences

a PSC Research Project [ARCHIVE DISPLAY]

Investigator:   Mick P. Couper

That race matters in housing outcomes is clear from the persistent patterns of racial residential segregation that characterize many of our nation’s metropolises. But the causes of this segregation are complex and have been hotly contested. In this proposal, we focus on individual-level housing search behaviors and experiences and racial residential preferences. Using survey and qualitative data from Chicago and Detroit, we address current controversies and holes in our knowledge about how race/ethnicity and racial attitudes, in concert with other key social, demographic, and economic characteristics, shape these housing-related experiences and preferences that, in the aggregate, perpetuate or reduce racial residential segregation. The research has the following specific aims:



Aim 1. To describe and compare the housing search strategies and experiences of Whites, African Americans, and Latinos.

Aim 2. To describe and then to determine the factors underlying the racial residential preferences of whites, African American, and Latinos, as measured using three different techniques:

Aim 2.1 Using reactions to videos of actual neighborhoods in which neighborhood racial composition was experimentally manipulated, we test the independent effects of racial composition and social and social class characteristics on respondent evaluations of neighborhoods.

Aim 2.2. Using a measure of residential preferences adapted for a multi-ethnic context in which respondents construct their most and least preferred neighborhood racial/ethnic composition, we describe these preferences, and then assess the important predictors (respondent’s race/ethnicity social class, racial attitudes, etc.) of these preferences.

Aim 3.3. Using specially-designed maps, we assess the impact of race (of the respondent and of the communities themselves) on the degree to which to which communities in a respondent’s metropolitan area are known, are attractive, or are unattractive to respondents as places to live.

Funding Period: 07/01/2006 to 06/30/2009

Country of Focus: USA

This PSC Archive record is displayed for historical reference.

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