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Next Brown Bag

Monday, Sep 22
Paula Fomby (Michigan), Family Complexity, Siblings, and Children's Aggressive Behavior at School Entry

Narayan Sastry photo

Children in Transition to Adulthood: Family and Siblings Connections

a PSC Research Project

Investigators:   Narayan Sastry, Jacquelynne S. Eccles, Robert F. Schoeni

The Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. families that began in 1968. With 34 waves of data collected on the same families and their descendents as of 2005, the PSID can justly be considered a cornerstone of the data infrastructure for empirically based social science research in the US. Through its long-term measures of economic and social well being, and based on its weighted representative sample of US families, the study has compelled both researchers and policy makers to confront and learn from the dynamism inherent in social and behavioral processes.



The study’s long-term span, genealogical design, and comprehensive content have been critical to understanding the life course effects of early childhood circumstances and experience on health, economic well-being, and mortality across time and space. However, information on children within PSID families was not extensive until 1997, when data on children ages 0-12 were collected. This project was called the Child Development Supplement (CDS-I). A second wave of data, CDS-II, were collected on these same children in 2002 when they were 5-18 years old. The current grant application, which is a competing continuation of the grant that funded CDS-II, proposes to collect new data on the CDS children and their families. Specifically, this application proposes to :



- Collect data in 2007 and 2009 for the 2,021 families of children who were participants in the CDS.

- Implement in 2007 a new study called “Transition to Adulthood,” that will collect 45 minutes of information from children who participated in CDS and who will be 18 or older as of 2007.

Funding Period: 04/10/2007 to 03/31/2013

Country of Focus: USA

Related Holdings, ICPSR Study #34489

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