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Elisha Renne (Michigan)

Narayan Sastry photo

Dislocation and Return of New Orleans Residents After Hurricane Katrina

a PSC Research Project [ARCHIVE DISPLAY]

Investigator:   Narayan Sastry

Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, Louisiana, on the morning of August 29, 2005. Virtually the entire population of the city was displaced and forced to resettle, which some did temporarily and others permanently. The toll from the hurricane and the displacement was immense. Even though this event occurred two years ago, research on many major topics of research and policy interest is only just beginning.

In this project, we will use new data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS) to examine the location of pre-Katrina residents of New Orleans in the year after the hurricane. The specific aim of the project is to describe the displacement and return or resettlement of this population and to analyze the factors that shaped these individuals’ location choices. The ACS data will provide a unique opportunity to examine the geographic dispersion of New Orleans residents throughout the U.S. in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

This project will make several important contributions. First, it will address a number of unanswered research and policy questions about the effects of Hurricane Katrina on the New Orleans population, such as: Where did displaced New Orleans residents reside in the year following the hurricane? What factors influenced where people lived, and how did the location of displaced residents vary by demographic and socioeconomic characteristics? What factors were associated with returning to New Orleans rather than resettling elsewhere? And what is the future size and composition of the New Orleans population likely to be? Second, it will form the basis for a follow-up project to conduct a more extensive and in-depth analysis of migration and well-being in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina that examines disparities in well-being among the affected population. Third, it will help establish the strengths and weaknesses of the ACS for examining the effects of Hurricane Katrina—as well as future natural and man-made catastrophes.

Funding Period: 12/01/2007 to 05/31/2009

Country of Focus: USA

This PSC Archive record is displayed for historical reference.

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