Home > Research . Search . Country . Browse . Small Grants

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

More News

Highlights

Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Narayan Sastry photo

Emerging Disparities in Chronic Disease Risk Among Young Adults

a PSC Research Project

Investigators:   Narayan Sastry, Philippa J. Clarke

The goal of this project is to examine early life influences on racial and ethnic disparities in chronic disease risk from an interdisciplinary perspective. Although chronic diseases exact their greatest toll on adults, their biological and behavioral origins are apparent much earlier in the life course. Research in this area has been hampered by data limitations, and little is known about the extent to which racial and ethnic disparities in chronic disease risk have emerged by young adulthood, nor how disparities in chronic disease risk and health-related behaviors are determined by social and behavioral factors operating over time at multiple contextual levels.

We will use data from all four waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) to describe young adult racial and ethnic disparities in behavioral and biological indicators of chronic disease risk; investigate the behavioral pathways and trajectories leading to racial and ethnic disparities in early adult chronic disease risk; and study how background and intermediate social, demographic, and economic factors, operating at multiple contextual levels and over the lifecourse, influence racial and ethnic disparities in chronic disease risk. A key focus of this work will be the public policy implications of the findings and, in particular, ways in which racial and ethnic disparities in emerging chronic disease can be reduced or eliminated.

Funding Period: 12/01/2008 to 11/30/2014

Search . Browse