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Next Brown Bag

Mon, March 23
Lundberg, State Care of the Elderly & Labor Supply of Adult Children

Jeffrey Morenoff photo

Reintegration of Formerly Incarcerated Young Adults

a PSC Research Project

Investigator:   Jeffrey Morenoff

This project addresses critical gaps in the literatures on prisoner reentry and on the transition to adulthood among vulnerable populations: the role of social contexts. First, what we know about reconstructing one’s life after incarceration is mostly based on individual-level factors such as criminal history. Moreover, this research rarely focuses on the challenges facing people released during the transition to adulthood. Second, we know little about the role of social contexts in the transition to adulthood generally, and nothing about the importance of social contexts for formerly incarcerated young adults. This project investigates the role of two key contexts – neighborhoods and households – in the transition to adulthood among formerly incarcerated young people. Our aims are as follows:

1. Investigate the social and institutional processes that sort formerly incarcerated young adults into more or less advantaged and disadvantaged social contexts – neighborhoods and households – after their release from prison.

2. Examine the effects of neighborhood and household contexts on outcomes critical to the transition to adulthood, including employment, schooling, substance use, and further criminal justice system involvement.

Funding Period: 04/01/2011 to 03/31/2014

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